compact Tag

I am a father. I had a father. He had a father. We're trained and qualified in fathering - it has been a family business. We know what we are talking about.I know what I look like*. I know what my father looked like. I know what my grandfather(s) looked like. I have seen the pictures - in the case of my father's picture, I took many of the images during his last 20 years.What do you look like? When you're gone what will you look like? You'll look like your pictures, that's what you'll look like - you children will see that as you. Wouldn't it be a good idea if what they saw was good-looking?You're a photographer - you wouldn't be reading this if you weren't. This is not a blog about liverwurst sandwiches. So...

What's the right price for a camera? This is a question that exercises the wits of many of our clients - but I sometimes wonder if they tend to fool themselves with the answer.We see all sorts of prices here. Some seem fair and some do not - I am particularly suspicious of low-ball offers coming from unidentifiable sources on the internet or passed by word-of-mouth. I think many of them are based on imagination - designed to hold the attention of the reader or listener until the unidentified source can invent the next one.Sometimes these prices are ludicrously high - anyone who has ever looked into the little camera store in Nürnberg will know what I mean - and one can only wonder if the writer of these advertisements has missed a couple days of medication. That is a kind thought, as is the one that assigns this sort of behaviour to a sense of humour. I'm not too sure - I looked in the window of that little store and I saw the owner and I don't think...

The new Sony Mk III is on the shelf right now. Looks like the Mk II except there is a real electronic viewfinder at the northwest corner so you can use it in the brightest sun.The sensor is the 1" size and it packs 20 megapixels on there. The LCD screen folds over 180º. there is a 24-70 f:1.8-2.8 equivalent lens.And it has that viewfinder. You pop it up and then pull the back section towards you. It parks back into the body with a reverse sequence. It has a diopter adjustment. At my age I feel uncomfortable using the word " awesome " but this idea actually is. It means you get to use the camera like a camera rather than like a Gameboy or a bar of soap.Roll on the technology migrating into more of the Sony range - they have had a bright idea....

Some of our customers want to do it all. They want to go on holiday with a small camera that is feather-weight, but has a massive zoom lens and an on-board flash and a touch screen and video and art programs and real-time light adjustments and an LCD electronic viewfinder and they are adamant that they will pay no more than $ 699.We accede to their demands. With the Olympus Stylus 1 camera. All of the above and a control ring around the circumference of the lens that can be programmed to do different things. Plus a sweet little folding lens cover that automatically closes on itself like a flower when you turn the camera off.The real seller feature for me is the finger and thumb dial you see on the upper right hand plate of the camera. It really is in the perfect position for the right hand as you operate the camera - unlike some of the compensation dials found on competitor's cameras. As you wizzle it around between finger and thumb you can see the light change...

It is no sin to get older and to have grandchildren. Nor is it wrong to want to have thousands of pictures of them plastered over the house and the internet. It is, however, a dreadful and terrible thing to make those pictures look bad. Nowadays there is no excuse for the out-of-focus image with heads lopped off and the colour gone to mud. Modern cameras can do better than that...

I am always amazed at the degree to which the Japanese designers of cameras succeed in miniaturising things. You see, I remember the Mamiya camera company's efforts in the medium format field and how they seemed to get bigger with each passing year. I do remember camping in the lee of an RZ67 for a week in inclement weather and was grateful for the shelter.No such shelter from the Panasonic Lumix GM camera and lens. It is a micro 4/3 camera that has been reduced to he smallest compass yet. I will not say the smallest size possible as they will take it for a challenge and then the next one will fit in your nostril. No sense poking the extremely small bear.As it is, this one is a beauty. Metal body, micro 4/3 mount, 12-32 lens. touch screen, 680 mAh battery, 2 custom channels, and Wifi built in. Stereo mic for video.built-in flash. makes BLT sandwiches. No, surely that can't be right...

By now a lot of people are familiar with tiny cinema.No, I don't mean those boutique multi-cimemas that they cram into basements - where you get 6 seats and a slushy machine and pay $24 for a ticket to a movie for French people sitting around a table eating*...

A few years ago I decided to be an Authentic Photographer. So I went out and bought things to make myself look like I was living in the 1950's. It was an easy choice - I still had a number of inherited articles of clothing from the time in my wardrobe and they were not worn-out yet so all I needed to add was the camera and film and darkroom equipment and film and chemistry of the period.I chose a Crown Graphic camera and a Graphic View with lenses and shutters from the same company - I think the glass was by Wollensack. I chose Ilford HP5 and Kodak Portra 160 sheet film. I used Rodinal developer and Fuji's version of C-41 chemicals. the paper was Ilford Multigrade IV. I ate pastrami sandwiches and drank cups of tea.I include the last reference because I haven't have a big breakfast and I'm hungry. It is equally authentic and equally false. The photography of the 1950's had nothing to do with me - any more than it had to do with C-41...