close up Tag

I mentioned the strange little symbol on the control dial of the new Olympus TG 5 yesterday. The one under the blue arrow: At first I though it was something in Klingon, but after I rotated it to the index mark to start the function I discovered that it is the macro function command...

Flower enthusiasts and botanists - and fungus people - are all experts in their fields. No, really they are. They know what looks good and right and how to grow it or find it. As a result their photos can be wonderful art - provided they can do the technical steps necessary to capture what they can see onto the digital memory. I approach the thing from the other end - I know how to make the picture look good but have no way of getting the garden to support me in the endeavour.  I have succeeded in killing artificial plants… All this said, here are a few test shots taken in our front-yard flower cemetery and back-yard weed factory. The items were selected with an eye to test out the Olympus OM-D E-M10 hand-held as if the user was a complete fool in the garden. As if… Note that the camera and lens are perfectly balanced for hand-held macro shots. You support the lens with the left hand and poke the shutter button with the right thumb. Your third and fourth arms...

I mentioned earlier in the week the unending quest for depth of field with studio tabletop illustration. In most cases of products or packs, we can shoot from such a distance that we avoid running out of depth of field. We select medium focal length lenses and stop down enough to get the thing sharp from the front of the product to the back. I do not know if anyone uses the facilities of the older monorail large format cameras to gain this sharpness - perhaps they would if there were an affordable digital sensor that you could slot into the back of the camera. But there isn't - no great new discovery of a 4 x 5 digital back has appeared.The pack shots take care of themselves - people also have the option for tilting and shifting if they use the larger full-frame cameras. For an amazing amount of money they can get tilt and shift lenses for their DSLR. Few give way to the need for amazement and many save their money...

I looked at the Fujifilm X-70 some time ago from a seller's point of view - the sleek appearance, the specifications, etc. Trying to push your urge-to-purchase buttons, but without charging up a battery and seeing if it would actually do the job. Today I took that extra step.My experience with the Fujifilm system grows as I add new lenses and bodies to the X system...

Two years ago I was allowed to own a Panasonic GX-7 camera with a 20mm lens for a week and was extremely impressed with the combination. It was an ideal choice for a genteel but thoroughly capable mirrorless camera. The glimpse that I got of the manufacturing processes of the company involved boosted my confidence in the whole concept of the micro 4/3 sensor in a camera.Panasonic never rest on their laurels, so after a suitable interval they issued the GX-8...

The new Fujifilm X-T2 is dazzling the mirrorless crowd right now, but the last two weblog columns showing the results of a studio shoot may have given the impression that it is no better than previous models. Here's where I reveal the truth - I was only looking at a small part of the picture before. There was some wiggle room there in the writing.You remember I showed little 1200 x 960 pixel images and they all looked about the same. Well have a look what happens when I go back to the main image and zero in on the motorcycle headlights.Yep. The extra division of the X-T2 sensor makes more pixels available for enlargement and the image is much, much smoother. So the advice here is to get the newer camera if you intend to blow your images up past A4 or if you need to extract small portions of them.You will also get the option of an additional film simulation setting over and above what the X-E2 or X-T1 can provide and even more compared to the X-Pro1...

Well here are the next with the series of Fujifilm X-series pictures taken of the Tomahawk Cafe. The motorcycles left outside the cafe provide closer detail and the salmon and coral Chevy Nomad that belongs to Miss Marsh the schoolteacher is the final test. All JPEGS, all unsharpened - straight off the cards:And the Nomad. Chevrolet's answer to a question that hardly anyone ever asked...

One of the advantages of owning your own studio is the fact that you can use it to do photographic experiments without interference from other people. You might be able to do this in a commercial rented space, but every minute you occupy the place costs money - and you might be tempted to skimp on the science to economise.You can also do photo experiments out in the open air on any number of subjects - if you are a landscape shooter, outside is where they keep landscape. But there are no end of atmospheric and optical variations that might be introduced and skew your results. And outside is dirty - if you're going to change lenses some of that dirt may get in the camera. Err...