Canon Tag

Canon users please draw nigh and give attention. We have a good thing for you.This blog post looked to be difficult for me - I do not use the Canon system cameras and I am somewhat clumsy with modern file storage and transfers. I trembled at the amount of complexity that I feared would be involved.Then I read the instructions and looked at a YouTube advertisement. It turns out that what looked like an elephant in the room was the little one from Walt Disney and I need not have feared looking like a Dumbo. This Canon hub is as easy as to use.Think of it as a 1 Terabyte storage device that you can put files into from Canon cameras or various smartphone devices. It connects to your television to let you store videos or see still files. You fill it up and away you go.Ideally, the connection to your phones and Canon cameras is wirelessly via WiFi or NFC. They realise that some people have older gear so there are ports in for USB connections and you can...

Okay, your friend has come with you into the shop - or perhaps it is the other way round. You may have the whole fam damily in there as well, and that can make for distraction and pressure - better to just keep it to two customers and one sales person. Note: the sales person does not have to be the owner of the shop. The staff are perfectly qualified to help, teach, and bargain, and you gain nothing by waiting for the boss. In fact, you lose time...

The One'a Dem series this week will showcase cameras that may be recommended to your mate with safety.I shall leave the manufacturer's representatives and fan-boy geeks to point out long lists of differences and advantages in their own favourite equipment in an attempt to gain superiority. The commonalities will be:a. Small - frame cameras. Your mate is a tourist with a family.b. Moderate 18-55 mm zooms.c. Automated operation. Your mate is not a great reader of instruction booksd. Actual availability. In-shop now. Your mate can have the camera before he gets on the Boeing.e. Affordable pricing. We need to leave spare cash for Bintang tee shirts and Jack Daniels at the duty-free. Today's kit is the Canon 700D. A bit bigger physically than the other cameras, and somewhat lighter. Of course, all three cameras have plastic-mount lenses of light construction, but if they are prepared to leave them on the mounts and not wear out the bayonet, the optics should actually do a very good job. The resolution, distortion, AF speed, and CA may not be up to the standard of...

I like to think that the people who read this weblog column are astute professionals and keen amateurs. Enthusiasts in art and science - renaissance men and women who can turn their minds and hands to any task. Experts, in short.Unfortunately, the readers will also be seen as experts by some of their friends who are not as well versed in photography. They may be seen as a resource to be exploited when it comes time to choose a camera. Sort of a walking CHOICE magazine. Someone who can do the hard yards of thinking and make sure that their mate gets something fabulously good for hardly any money at all.Maaaaaate...

Well, it has been a week since the motor sport workshop up at Barbagallo raceway, and you've been able to read some of the things that Manuel Goria told us about the techniques of shooting. Now here's the final bits of advice regarding the physical business of chasing cars.a. Where do they race cars? At car race courses. Some are good places for pictures, and some are awful ( guess which category Barbagallo falls in...

In the previous weblog columns this week we have mentioned that our motor sport professional - Manuel Goria - insists that the image must be focused. You must fight overexposure, shaky hands, and heat haze to get the focus point dead on where you need it and everything around it pin-sharp.And now you get to ignore that advice with his next lesson - when and how to pan the camera.We all know about panning a camera to follow the movement of a passing bird, plane, car, or person. It gives us a chance to have the main subject in focus while everything around it is blurring out. The blur is a stream of motion behind or in front of the thing that we wish the viewer to concentrate on. It's simple to do. Not.Oh, it is simple to twist oneself around, but trying to coordinate the rate of twist and the change in rate ( plus the change in change of rate...

Pardon the pun - the professional photographer who delivered the Canon Australia Motor sport workshop is named Manuel Goria. He is a world traveller and a world worker in the business of illustration of motor sport - Formula One all over the place as well as other types of racing. That's him in the heading image before the heat started, pointing the way to the track.*It is hard to report the entire lecture that Manuel gave in one web post - there were so many good practical points that he covered. Rather than cop out, I will take several days. Let's start with the equipment recommendations:Not surprisingly, he recommended Canon. He uses the brand's large professional 1Dx cameras - several of them - and keeps long lenses on them. The Canon professional optics are second to none for this sort of precision and the agencies and editors who are concerned with his work are not going to be satisfied with sub-standard images. This is also tied in with the rapid autofocus response and shoot time available with the Canon professional...

Way back in 2014 Canon Australia and Camera Electronic hosted a workshop day at Barbagallo raceway to show enthusiasts how to take motor sport photographs. I attended and it was the noisiest day of my life apart from the battle of Waterloo. Well last Saturday they did it again, but this time with even bigger motors - this time it was not motorcycles, but full-sized Porsche sports cars.It's not just a case of standing out there going deaf - the core of the day was comprised of a very professional presentation by a person who is a motor sport photographer. The target audience were enthusiasts who love race cars and who have an interest in the Canon brand...