Canon Tag

Did goe to the drag races yesterday and was greatley entertained. The event was far too busy and far too many colourful cars were seen to be reported here - if you wish to see what transpired you must go to:hrhoa.wordpress.comThe blog is " Here All Week" and there will be a stream of posts regarding the races and car show emanating from it during the coming weeks. The blog you're reading right now is the work one that sells cameras so we must keep on topic...

If ever you needed a spare battery for your digital camera, now is the time to come in and get it. We have just put up a rack of Promaster rechargeable batteries that is about half the size of Tasmania.There are modern batteries as well as slightly historic ones in the selection - and some from manufacturers that no longer make cameras. Altogether we have 95 pegs out with far more than 95 different types.They are at an advantageous price and carry thee no-quibble Promaster warranty.The really surprising thing is when you turn to the more ordinary battery rack on a side wall. There are the familiar D, C, AA, and AAA batteries that we all put into torches and kid's toys. There are the little flat 9 volt batteries that go into calculators. And the little silver cells that power cameras. All pretty standard sizes, and most camera manufacturers used to configure their products to take them readily.So when did the camera designers thing it was a good idea to make the new gear with 95+ different types of...

Many of us have cameras that hang round our necks. Or over our shoulders. Or suspended from a HIAB crane off the back of a tray-top Toyota. This is because in our impetuous youth we desire ever bigger lenses and camera bodies. We have muscles and ambition.Later, both of these attributes go. We find our desire to haul heavy machinery long distances abates and we trade our Flapflex Massiva Grandissimo camera for a mirrorless and are much happier. When we do, we have a new option for hauling the camera about.We can attach it to our right hand and eschew the neck strap altogether. The camera will stick to us like a bad reputation and we can hoist it or lower it for candid street photography with no fear that it will skitter off over the pavement. It will be discrete, even when we are not.Try one of the many varieties. Just don't forget that you have your mirrorless attached to it and absentmindedly try to scratch your nose....

There is a time an a place for everything - and stealthy silent behaviour is frequently required in torpedo attacks, street photography, and federal caucus meetings. It never does to alert the potential victims.To this end the Fujifilm company and a number of other manufacturers have included quiet modes in their cameras. Some are more effective than others; in some cases the reduction in sound is not very much - in others it is complete.As far as silent cameras go I do remember an Olympus EE film camera of the 1960's that had a leaf shutter actuated in some way by electric circuitry. Even with the acute hearing of youth - pre air drills or military rifles - I could not hear it as it was operated.With the Hasselblad 500-series you had a pre-release of the mirror that allowed you to get that noise over with before firing the shutter - and if you kept your finger on the shutter button afterwards there was no more sound until you were away from the scene.The Nikon company have Q modes in...

Gone. Gone forever. It has rolled off the roof, where you were taking pictures of the nurse's quarters, and fallen into a newly-opened bottomless pit that has appeared in your back yard.What are you going to do?This depends upon whether you had the foresight to purchase a Mack Diamond Warranty when you got the lens. If that was under three years ago you can breathe a sigh of relief.Ring up the Mack people, tell them the sad news, and wait for them to send you a cheque for the replacement cost of another Very Favourite Lens. They are men of honour - if you have a Diamond Warranty you are covered for three years against impact damage, manufacturer defects, sand/grit damage, accidental or unintentional abuse, mechanical malfunction, and abnormal wear and tear.You are still required to keep your gear secure against human thieves - they cannot really insure you against patently criminal activity. For that matter, neither can some police forces...

It has been a tradition for aircraft developed by the British that each successive  important development of a particular airframe has received a sequential Mark number. As the British are all classicists at heart, these numbers are written in Roman numerals. But eventually they ran out of paint, or space on the fuselage, or erks that could read Latin, and had to succumb to using regular numbersThus we had Supermarine Spitfires that went all the way up to Mk.47, but chickened out about the Mk. XXIV as far as the  numerical designations. Had the RAF employed curates, prelates, and bishops to maintain the aircraft they might have got up to Mk. XLVII and brought a bit of ton to the station...