Canon Tag

A little while ago we showed the Canon twin-flash for macro workers. A TTL solution for illuminating the tiniest of worlds. Well today here is a suitable lens for it - the new 35mm Macro IS STM for the RF system. A very tempting piece of glass. The 35mm focal length is somewhat ideal for both small and full-frame cameras - a normal field of view for the former and not too wide for the latter. Of course there is some debate as to what a normal field of view might be when you move to 1:1 macro - but you can decide for yourself by raising your spectacles and peering closely at something a couple of inches away from your nose. Get to the point where your focusing ability just about runs out and before you lose the ability to set the stereo images together in your head. That's how wide you can see, so that's the standard for you. Those of you who have markedly different abilities in either eye - one working better than the other at certain distances...

A lot of manufacturers say that they are dedicated to the small world of macro photography - and they point to one lens in their range with that word on the barrel. Or to a small flower symbol somewhere in their digital menu. Mount the lens or press the icon and all will be tiny and in perfect focus...

You gotta give it to 'em for showmanship. Cheryl and Maureen from Canon Australia set up their mystery display at Camera Electronic's Stirling Street premises a half hour before noon yesterday - but they insisted that no-one got a look at it until the 12:00 o'clock embargo was lifted. Apparently there were two other Canon Australia representatives down at the Murray Street Store. They were all mysterious but good at their word - dead on 12:00 we got to see the new Canon mirror-less camera - the Canon EOS RP. They got a crowd. They also got media coverage - Jennifer Villa-Lobos was doing a two-handed live Facebook feed for the shop. Saul was there to let people know about a special offer in respect of the new camera - there are special accessory grips available for the camera. People got to handle the cameras and operate them. The camera seems to be a lighter and smaller model of their current new EOS R mirror-less line - perhaps aimed at the travelling photographer. As you can see it loses none of the functionality of...

I do not often get a chance to test Sigma lenses here in the column - I don't own a Canon, Nikon, or Sony body to which they might be attached. But this week I got the opportunity to grab a demo-body Canon from the shelves to exercise a Sigma macro lens - and I am delighted that I could.  I've had a good morning in the studio. The Canon body was the 75oD - a very capable small-frame body with a number of modern features - not the least of which is a modern and efficient processor. I cannot pretend to be a Canon expert, but the operation was simple enough to let me use it as I would my normal mirror-less. I did not figure out the live view in the small time I had it but I'm sure it was there somewhere. The body functioned flawlessly. The lens was the Sigma 70mm F2.8 DG Macro. I know that means that it could also function on a full-frame body, but I am used to APS-C sensors for my tabletop work...

It should be no secret to the readers of this column that I base many of my stories around the things I find in the Camera Electronic storeroom. A weekly walk-through lets me see if anything new and interesting has arrived and made it through the receiving and cataloging procedures. Some weeks are replete with goods - some are bare. And some are puzzling. I find things. Single examples of odd equipment that need study - to see exactly what it might be good for. And large amounts of other things - nests of equipment, if you will. Bought in batches and sitting there ready for the shelves. This is an example of a nest of Canon superzooms. Before you squawk about how big a zoom needs to be before it is considered super, just reflect that a few years ago a 3 X zoom was considered daring. And people could go out and go wild with it. How much wilder can they go with the modern digital - in this case 65 X. I know there's bigger, but this is a...

MOGENS JOHANSEN puts photographic heavyweights through their paces Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to this Travel Club Mirrorless championship fight. Under the bright lights in the Exposure Triangle we have three new contenders. In the red corner, Canon’s new full-frame sensor camera — the 30.3 Megapixel Canon EOS R. In the green corner, Nikon’s new full-frame sensor camera — the 45.7 Megapixel Nikon Z7; and in the blue corner, fighting slightly out of its weight class, Fujifilm’s new APSC sensor camera — the 26 Megapixel Fujifilm X-T3. This challenge has come about because of the recent spate of new releases in this category and the winner of the contest will earn the right to challenge Sony as the leader in the mirrorless weight class. All three are similar in size, compact but big enough to feel comfortable to hold. Canon and Nikon have released new lenses for the new cameras but their full range of lenses are fully compatible with new adapters. Canon’s new RF lenses are beautiful pieces of glass but look quite big on the compact EOS R. Nikon’s new Z lenses are...

The choice of which lens to put on the new Canon EOS R camera was an easy one for me to make - the one in the box. The kit comes with a 24-105mm f:4 lens. It is an L lens - red ring - and has an internal stabilising system. It is a second cousin to the 24-105 f:4 L IS that has been seen on any number of Canon DSLR cameras over the last decade...