Canon Tag

One of the greatest ideas I never had was the photo booth. They have proved to be profitable business for photographers as their own venture or in combination with other coverage - weddings and parties are a prime target for this sort of activity.To make it work the photographer has to have a camera system that will operate repeatedly without failure and make sharp and colourful files for the clients. Whether these files are to be printed out or collected and transferred to disc or drive media is up to the organisers but it's generally true to say that the output shots do not need to be fine art - though some of them may end up as that.If you're going to print things out on the occasion and supply them to the subjects straight away, there are especial printers and computer programs that can put a fast set of images together and run them out in seconds. It's not really the job for the average inkjet printer, either in terms of time or costs - there can be little...

A recent column that dealt with stolen cameras seems to have garnered a great deal of interest - so I've decided to add some thoughts on the matter of further security for photography.The original column mentioned stolen cameras and suggested increased security measures for equipment inside cars. Now it is the turn for the same security inside the home.A. Equipment safety. You may have anywhere from $ 400 to $ 40,000 invested in cameras and lenses. If you put them into camera bags and cases and then put those cases inside the wardrobe your security level is that of the MDF board on that wardrobe. About 3mm of pressed wood pulp. Perfectly adequate to protect your 1980 safari suit against moths but no help if a burglar with a habit breaks in and looks for saleable items.Look up locksmiths and safes. If you have space in your home for the wardrobe, you have room in the wardrobe for a safe or storage cabinet. It doesn't need to be Fort Knox - it just needs to deter the casual criminal. I've...

People love touch screens - whether they are on tablets, smart phones, or camera LCD screens, the public cannot seem to get enough of them. They poke, tap, swipe, scroll and twirl all day. The images open, close, expand, contract, and disappear forever.I very nearly hate the touch screen.When I use it on my iPad it gives me none of the tactile feedback that the standard keyboard does. Each stroke I make as I write this tells me that the wireless keyboard has registered my entry by a small sink and tap feedback. Even if I am not looking at the screen as I type...

Or grey, or gritty. You can be good - and you can have a good price, too.Just saw a small stack of ex-demo Tamron lenses sitting on the back counter on Monday night. They're that good prices and are the now modern style Tamron - very sharp. Wide zoom, long zoom, macro...

There are very few occasions when you see light coming up from under a subject in real life; some discotheques in the 80's had light panel floors, you can see it in the classical footlights at the burlesque theatre, and when you open the hatch of hell there is a sort of a lurid glow that comes up. The effect can be quite unsettling.It is stock in trade for Disney artists and illustrators of fantasy and science fiction when they want to make a subject look evil.But it is also a very valid technique when you are trying to illustrate products for advertisements. In many cases the art director wants the viewer to see all parts of the subject evenly lit for either sales appeal or technical illustration. In some instances this is difficult to achieve with the classic hard/soft light or even with a light tent. No matter where you place the lights, the thing always has a shadow around the bottom bits.Enter the light table. A support for the subject that is sturdy enough to bear the weight,...

Funny how a buzz-phrase arrives into your vocabulary. You never invent the thing, but one day you find yourself uttering it and you really can't be certain where it came from.Some blame social media, some blame America, and some blame slang...

Yep. I was right. You can find things to do on a damp Friday in Perth.In particular, if you have a Fujifilm X-T 10 camera and an 18-135 mm lens and an airplane-mad daughter who in turn has a football-mad boyfriend, it can all come together beautifully.Hauled out of the house at 1:30 in the afternoon to go to Perth Airport, I took the Fujifilm along to the viewing deck of the terminal building to await the arrival of a rare visitor to Perth - an Etihad Airlines Airbus that is painted in the colours of the Manchester City Football Club. The D and the D's BF both support that soccer club and watch their matches at all hours of the day and night. I suspect the club is owned by Etihad.It was a bright but moist day and they were using the short runway at the airport for the takeoffs and landings, presenting the port side of the aircraft as they headed west. The observation deck is readily accessible to visitors without going through any of the cavity searches...

Every single time some expert writes an internet article to tell me that I shouldn't do that, I can't do that, or I didn't do that, I go out and make the mistake of doing it. And in 73% of cases I should, can, and did succeed. The victories can be very small, of no interest to anyone but myself, and sweet as summer sunshine - based solely upon the fact that I defied the expert.The other 27% of the time I scrape the residue off the ceiling and air out the studio. Don't ask.Case in point is the fan-boy-forum advice that you can't take successful action pictures with a mirror-less camera - particularly if you use an adapted lens and try to work in poor light. Telling me this was like Nolan telling Cardigan where the guns were...