Canon Tag

Sports photography captures the essence of sports, the breath of the environment and the life that everyone gathers to experience. It is also the unique insight to showcase perspectives that are somewhat challenging to see otherwise. Think about the 2021 AFL Grand Final taking place in Perth this year. There will be roughly 60,000 people anticipating seeing something special on the 25th of September, 2021. As an attendee, we are limited by the location of our seats. As a sports photographer, we are limited by our imagination. The camera unlocks our potential to capture something that is yet to be seen. Sports photography, in general, is known for action that can take place in a matter of milliseconds. A snapshot in the making, however, are we ready to take a photograph?    Sports Photography Essential Camera Features   Cameras with autofocus features date back to the 1970s. So much has changed since then, and we live in a time where technology is breaking ground every so often. In addition to this, sports have been evolving too. Athletes are stronger and faster - as a...

If you’re looking for the ideal home photography project, look no further than scanning and printing from the comfort of your own home. If you’ve been at the game long enough or are new to film photography, chances are you have dozens of film negatives lying around. Regardless of them being from decades ago or last week, wouldn’t you love to scan and print these at home? Take your film photography to the ultimate level by scanning negatives, managing them as digital files, and printing them.    Scans To Last a Lifetime   While photo labs can do this for you overnight, it takes time to post your negatives in and receive your prints back. Plus, you have no creative control over the process. And what if you only want the one high-quality print from a roll of film? The answer is to use a high-end film scanner to digitise your analogue film. With the right scanner, you can digitise 35mm and 120 films into files that can be loaded into Adobe Photoshop, Lightroom or your software of choice.     Epson Perfection V850 Pro Scanner   The folks...

If you thought the Indianapolis 500 was a gruelling race you want to go to a PhotoLive trade show as a wholesale representative  or the official photographer. By the end of the day you'll be ready for the pits! Here's Brenda and  Julie at the Canon stand taken early in the day before the thundering herds arrived. They are cheerful and relaxed, and not at all apprehensive. They both know that the Canon equipment will not let them down - whether thry are selling it or shooting with it. Note that Julie is using an on-camera flash to raise the light level of the venue, clean up the colour balance, and tame the shadows that overhead spot lighting can sometimes produce. If you're ever in the same position - having to be a fast-moving worker in a variety of lighting situations, emulate her - a speed light is often the difference between a blah shot and a sparkler. Note to self: Emulate Julie in the footwear department as well. I chose my old black shop boots with the bovver toecaps for the day,...

When planning and packing for an outdoor adventure, most of us grab our trusty DSLR or mirrorless camera. Add to this some suitable lenses for landscape or wildlife along with fresh batteries and memory cards. But have you ever considered that you might be missing out on something? A handy addition to any wildlife or landscape photography kit is a pair of binoculars.  Binoculars have come a long way since the models our grandparents handed down to us. Bulky, heavy and optically imperfect antiques have retired. These have given way to modern binoculars with the same level of build and optics quality as a modern camera lens. It is also astounding just how many styles and variants of binoculars there are. What’s more, brands such as Nikon, Canon, Olympus and even Leica develop precision binoculars. They all have a long history of making precision optics for more than just camera gear.      There’s a lot to be gained from packing a pair of quality binoculars on your next outdoor adventure. For wildlife photographers, it provides a means to quickly scan a location and...

Bear with me. I have been shown a marvellous Canon camera that I cannot fully appreciate - I can only parrot what I've been told. I'm not a video shooter. Indeed the last movie I went to see had Danny Kaye in it and it cost 2/6d to get in. I could even afford a choc bomb without having to take out a loan from the bank. The chief selling feature of the new Canon EOS C 70 seems to be the use of the RF lens mount. These are the Canon lenses intended for their line of mirror-less still cameras ( themselves quite capable in the video line ) and have extremely good performance on the Canon sensors. The literature refers to the format as super 35, though there seem to be a number of choices that users can make about the size and shape of recording field. There is even one that makes a portrait-orientation shot intended for inclusion on smart devices. That's good thinking as so many people use social media sites to show their productions. Okay, the lit....

In the rush to supply cameras that shoot images to a fabulously high ISO we often forget that there is such a thing as an on-camera flash. That is until we try the ISO trick in some place that not only has insufficient light, but suffers from foully mixed colour emperatures and a subject that moves faster than we can cope with. Eventually all the high-tech solutions to seeing are exhausted and we either have to light up the subject or go home. Canon have always made a very popular and capable set of electronic flashes that integrate with their cameras. The latest one - the Speedlite EL-1 is in the Murray Street shop right now. The basic form of the thing is the same as it has always been - large tilting head - electronics and batteries in the bottom - and a multi-contact foot for the hot shoe. With the EL-1 , however I note some new things that I haven't encountered before: a. High-capacity Lithium ion battery for 300+ full power flashes and a full power recharge time of .9...

And that just about describes the last couple of months, eh? I am assuming that you have, like my family, been doing the right thing and hunkering down in the bunker. So far we are safe and cabin fever has not set in. We wait the day of the big breakout, however. So, back to the cameras. And the dilemmas of which, what, how, why, etc. The first thing to do is to consider whether you need to have a dilemma at all. Do you need two lemmas? Would one do? For many of us, it would. One camera. One only - and with one lens on it, too. This may seem a little anti-business for a firm that would like to sell you many cameras, but remember that the founder of Camera Electronic - Ron Frank - was a genius at helping people decide which single camera they needed. He could, and did, ask exactly the right question at exactly the right time. If he could get a clear answer from the client, he could hand them precisely what they needed. If...

No, relax Vasco. I'm not going into competition with you. Good luck with Home Opens in the coming months and the jiggery-pokery of social distancing while trying to sell houses. I do not envy you the job. But I did find some empty space to sell when I took a Canon EOS R out of the display cabinet and fitted a 24-200 mm lens on it. The lens was the pull in the first instance as it looked newish and when I considered that I was looking at a full-frame 24 x 36 sensor camera...