Canon Tag

And that just about describes the last couple of months, eh? I am assuming that you have, like my family, been doing the right thing and hunkering down in the bunker. So far we are safe and cabin fever has not set in. We wait the day of the big breakout, however. So, back to the cameras. And the dilemmas of which, what, how, why, etc. The first thing to do is to consider whether you need to have a dilemma at all. Do you need two lemmas? Would one do? For many of us, it would. One camera. One only - and with one lens on it, too. This may seem a little anti-business for a firm that would like to sell you many cameras, but remember that the founder of Camera Electronic - Ron Frank - was a genius at helping people decide which single camera they needed. He could, and did, ask exactly the right question at exactly the right time. If he could get a clear answer from the client, he could hand them precisely what they needed. If...

No, relax Vasco. I'm not going into competition with you. Good luck with Home Opens in the coming months and the jiggery-pokery of social distancing while trying to sell houses. I do not envy you the job. But I did find some empty space to sell when I took a Canon EOS R out of the display cabinet and fitted a 24-200 mm lens on it. The lens was the pull in the first instance as it looked newish and when I considered that I was looking at a full-frame 24 x 36 sensor camera...

You might be forgiven for thinking that wireless triggers are simple things. So they are, when all you wish to do is tell a circuit to close at a distance from the camera. You put a transmitter on the hot shoe of the camera, a receiver under the speedlight out in the distance, and fire away. As long as the things are plugged in correctly and the AA batteries are fresh, it works every time. When you start to go TTL, however, and start to introduce different models of different maker's flashes, the whole thing becomes as complex as a spider's web. Here's a collage of images from the different trigger systems here in the shop on just one day. Beware that not all triggers made are shown - you have miles to go in this forest before you can sleep...

An earlier column mentioned Tamron as a brand name and poked a little gentle fun at the Adaptall system that this company used in the film era. Readers may have gotten the impression that we thought little of the lenses - such is not the case. Camera Electronic and probably tens of thousands of Australians have a keen appreciation of the worth of the Tamron brand and products. It has developed over many items and many decades. Here's an example of what Tamron could do in the analog days  - do for themselves and do for you. It's a 17mm f:3.5 lens with a Nikon AI mount affixed to the back. A similar lens would have been available for most of the major mounts in those days. If its design reminds you a little of Nikon or Tokina remember that the Japanese companies did see people and ideas flow from one to another. Its mount is all metal, as things were in those days, and is sturdy and precise. The lens grind is excellent and the coating does a good job. And...

If you are determined, we can't stop you. Indeed, the best thing that can be done is to reach into the Sigma cabinet and pull out the 14mm f:1.8 DG HSM Art lens and let you put it on your Nikon or Canon. Then you can head out for your architecture, landscape, or astro photography and we can feel that we've done our best for you. You will not go away lightly - you'll be adding 1120 g to your burden, and if this is out bush to get the landscape or the star view, that's a significant weight. No wonder- the barrel is fully professional and there are 16 elements - three of them aspherical - inside it. You 'll be operating the aperture electro-mechanically with either mount and you'll also have a option to add a rear filter if you're using the Canon version. Quite what you can do with a filter arrangement up the front is beyond me - this is a very wide view of the universe for a full-frame camera - and the adaptation you'll need for...

Make two people happy - yourself and our accountant. Gather in, Canon enthusiasts who want to work with small, light cameras, lenses, and flashes but want to work in a sophisticated manner. We have a flash idea for you. The Canon  Speedlite EL 100 may not look like the brightest flash you have ever seen - it has a guide number of 26  - but it gives you a chance to think on different terms than just the old blast o' light from the camera position. We've all done that, and we 'll continue to do it when it serves a good purpose ( Note that the illustration shots were taken using a portable product studio and a blast o' light from the hot shoe of a Fujifilm camera. BO'L is fine when you need frontal illumination. ) but there are times when art or science needs more light from more directions. This is the principle of the studio flash set of strobes and the $6000 worth of reflectors, softboxes, and triggers. If you need 'em, we got 'em, and don't lets let...