accessories Tag

Those of you who think they have seen these products in this column before are right - I've been mentioning these and similar items for years. But not everyone who reads this page with their Weeties has seen those older postings. The wonderful thing about photography is that it is a subject that always attracts new enthusiasts. And the fact of the matter is that the new enthusiasts sometimes have old problems.* The problem that the Unipal chargers from the Hähnel company addresses is the circumstance where a photographer discovers that they have no charger for their camera or flash batteries. Either it has been left at home while they travel or been stolen or lost. Or, if it is an older charger, it has just quit working. I've personal experience of this - having had to replace chargers on two separate occasions. It's not an isolated thing - every week when I was behind the counter there were a number of people who came in and wanted fresh chargers - sometimes several requests per day. It was the sort of thing...

Most people know that Ireland for a long time had no snakes - having had them all removed by St. Patrick. I'm not sure if anyone has seen fit to smuggle more back in the meantime, but the Hähnel company has played with the legend a little by naming one of their products " the Viper ". * You can regard that as wry humour if you like, but the fact remains that it is a good product - a control system for TTL flash from external speedlights. I found two versions on the Camera Electronic accessory wall - for Nikon and for Canon. I shouldn't wonder if they might not think up versions for other flash systems, now that the mirror-less movement is rolling on. j Briefly, the transmitter and control box allow the coupling of the maker's flash units wirelessly and with TTL control over a 100 metre range. You can send out signals to three different groups of flashes and control what they are going to do from the transmitter itself - no need to go out to the flashguns. You...

I am in an excellent position to write on this subject as I have served a long apprenticeship in the trade of buying - and in many cases I have bought junk. Like most people who have done this, there were a number of factors that entered into it: a. I have had money that was burning a hole in my pocket. b. I have felt a vague need for something. c. I have not thought sufficiently about the design of something - or the materials  - or the construction. d. I have not had any experience with the goods in question. Only the last in the list had any real validity - the rest were somewhat of a shame on me. But once having gone through the process of buying the junk, and finding out all about it, I could eliminate this in the future. Let me help you out with one little matter from our photographic accessories in the shop - the business of the cable release. In this case it will be specifically the mechanical release. Look on your camera and see if there is...

I realise now that I made a mistake - I accept this. When the customer came into the shop all those years ago and asked: " Where can I stuff this stocking? " Well, I should have been slower to answer. Kinder. Gentler. More professional...

No, We're not talking about another footballer's romance or a North Korean threat - it's the Lastolite Ezybox Micro - possibly the lightest of the large diffusers for speed lights. Certainly one of the easiest to put on and off. Speed light diffusers have a long history - all the way from those rigid plastic panels that you clipped above the Metz 45-series hammerhead flashes in the 1970's through to the strobist craze five years ago. There were innumerable things that attached to your speed light with rubber bands and velcro straps. Nearly all of them worked and nearly all of them were a pain. The ones that went on easily, came off easily - usually when you moved your camera from horizontal to vertical. The ones that stuck tight needed a welder's degree to attach and an oxy torch to take off. And the matter of needing a diffuser in the middle of an event shoot meant that both of these possibilities could occur at the same time. The heavy ones strained the joints of the speedlights - you would have...