Right! Now Chuck Norris can take up photography. Arnold Schwarzenegger can start shooting with a DSLR rather than a Gatling gun. Magda Szubansky can lay into her critics. We've got a camera strap for super-heroes. The Black Rapid Wrist Strap ( catchy name, eh? ) is the toughest thing since they started making breech blocks for 17 pounders. And hyperbole aside ( and we sell the biggest hyperbole in the trade! ) it is a good tough product in a place where tough is actually important. The Black Rapid products are all generally pretty rugged - we've sold the shoulder slings and harnesses for years and they've hauled tonnes of cameras for lots of shooters. But the big slings are just that - big - and if you don't want to shoulder the burden, you need something to secure your camera and lens just as sturdily. Hence the Wrist Strap. The nylon webbing's pretty soft but very strong. The carabiner and swivel are weapon's grade stuff - including a safety lock to  keep the hook shut. The Black Rapid people advise you to get...

A recent post regarding the Fujifilm X-100F camera drew critical response from a reader - as much for my style of writing, I suspect, as for the content of the column. Well, to paraphrase President Lincoln, you can please some of the people all the time and all of the people some of the time, but...

No, you can't buy this book of family photographs. It's the publisher's proof - the only one left after all 600 copies were sold. 600 copies of a family picture book? Who sells that many? Sam Harris. The English photographer who gave us a Shoot photography talk last night. It was a ripper of a talk on a cold Sunday night and well worth listening to - not least for those of the audience who might have been thinking about their own photographic or photo book career. Sam detailed his start in film photography, his initial successes in record and CD cover work in the UK, and his assignments throughout the world for editorial work. Yes, he did get to go up in that helicopter with Mr. Lydon, the chap in the striped shirt you saw in the advertisement, and no, he was not ill on him - though apparently it was a close-run thing. He explained the journeys of discovery he and his family had made in India and Australia prior to coming to WA and showed some of the experimental work he...

Are we allowed to use our cameras for as long as we want to? Or are we required by law to turn them in and get new ones? If we are, what is the legal time we can have them? Sound like a Facebook troll question? Well, this is still not a forum and I'm not writing this from under the bridge, so you can relax - but it is a pretty good question. Like all debates it has several answers - and some of them might be relevant for you. a. You should use your old equipment until it cannot be used any more. This is a fine and frugal answer for some - and it has echoes in the past. The users of Kodak 116, 616, 828, and 126 films might well have done just this - used their cameras until Kodak pulled the pin on them. The ingenious and hardy may still be using them - adapted to other media or using respooled film. If they do, whatever they achieve is a golden mark on their character sheet - they...

Every year since we got these Op/Tech accessories into the shop we've been making a point of telling people about them. Because every single year winter has come around and photographers have gone out into the rain with their extremely expensive equipment. Most of them have not started out with that intention - they've googled the weather and looked at the little diagram on the BOM site and ignored the bit where it says the probability of rain is 124%. " She'll be right - I'll be fine " and the extremely expensive gear goes into the not-very-water-resistant camera bag and off they go. And it's all good when they get there and get out away from the car and into the spot with no shelter at all...

I'm going to have a good Sunday - the one coming up on the 1st of July. First, it's Dominion Day in Canada and even here in Perth we get to drink Molsons and eat butter tarts, eh? And for those of us from Calgary, we get to bag Edmonton. Normally doesn't get better than that. But it does. At 6:00 PM that Sunday I'm going to repair to Shoot photography ( full of Molsons and tarts ) to hear the British photographer Sam Harris speak on his photographic experiences from London to the bush. You may have seen the advertisement for the talk on your CE email news feed or on posters at the shop. He's had extensive press and commecial experience there and here. It's not going to be dear - $ 49 - so you might want to ring up the shop this week and make a booking - it may get crowded out otherwise. Words , pictures, anecdotes, equipment ideas, techniques...

I'm not one for watching murder mysteries on television - I like mine in book form written by Mike Hammer or Agatha Christie. I'll occasionally delve into the Sherlock Holmes era as well, but wherever the story is set, I have one common experience - I fail to see the clues. Of course, that's what I'm supposed to do to keep the suspense up until the end, and I play along and am amazed on cue in the end. Any novel that has lost the last three pages is a well of frustration. Well...