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Are you sick of taking food photos with your smartphone? Do you want to step up your game and get serious with food photography? We have the best starter kit for food photography at Camera Electronic. Our kit brings you all the essential elements for professional quality food photography. What's more, this kit is compact and lightweight, meaning you can set it up in a restaurant or at home. Plus, if you intend to go pro and start taking food photography for a living, this is the article for you. The Fujifilm and Profoto products we have selected will deliver top-notch product shots.      Food photography is a growing industry with a lot of interest in the genre - especially in a world that is fast-moving online with grocery and meal delivery services. The days of the humble pizza menu have succumbed to an increasing range of food photography expectations. Fast food delivery services now cover everything from fish and chips and beer to snack runs from the local convenience store.  And now we see the rise in prepared meal services arriving at...

Bear with me. I have been shown a marvellous Canon camera that I cannot fully appreciate - I can only parrot what I've been told. I'm not a video shooter. Indeed the last movie I went to see had Danny Kaye in it and it cost 2/6d to get in. I could even afford a choc bomb without having to take out a loan from the bank. The chief selling feature of the new Canon EOS C 70 seems to be the use of the RF lens mount. These are the Canon lenses intended for their line of mirror-less still cameras ( themselves quite capable in the video line ) and have extremely good performance on the Canon sensors. The literature refers to the format as super 35, though there seem to be a number of choices that users can make about the size and shape of recording field. There is even one that makes a portrait-orientation shot intended for inclusion on smart devices. That's good thinking as so many people use social media sites to show their productions. Okay, the lit....

I'm always on the catch-up as far as the computer goes - I operate a Mac that doesn't have the latest operating system. And I've resisted the calls to upgrade as it would cancel out my printer and scanner. The result is I am always a little behind the clock with RAW file decoding. I can't boil down Fujifilm X-E4 files. Anything I shoot with it has to be jpeg...

On my Camera Electronic Day Out - my tour of the city shops - I was taken by the display of the electric vehicles in Wanderlust. My interest was stimulated by a recent social media post by a friend. He had been scootering on a footpath near his home and steered with more enthusiasm than balance. The photo that appeared on Facebook of him with casts on both broken wrists  was remarkable, to say the least. I hope that this is a rare occurrence amongst others, and for him, only the once. The thought of having an itchy nose with two arm casts is daunting. Now scooters are not the only electric vehicles going - I counted a bicycle, a two-wheeled Segway, and a pair of controllable electric roller-shoes. Thomas was game to test them out - he's good with the Segway and fair with the shoes. As yet he has no broken limbs, but I am writing this on Easter Sunday and there is always time before the column goes to press to change that...

In the rush to supply cameras that shoot images to a fabulously high ISO we often forget that there is such a thing as an on-camera flash. That is until we try the ISO trick in some place that not only has insufficient light, but suffers from foully mixed colour emperatures and a subject that moves faster than we can cope with. Eventually all the high-tech solutions to seeing are exhausted and we either have to light up the subject or go home. Canon have always made a very popular and capable set of electronic flashes that integrate with their cameras. The latest one - the Speedlite EL-1 is in the Murray Street shop right now. The basic form of the thing is the same as it has always been - large tilting head - electronics and batteries in the bottom - and a multi-contact foot for the hot shoe. With the EL-1 , however I note some new things that I haven't encountered before: a. High-capacity Lithium ion battery for 300+ full power flashes and a full power recharge time of .9...

I have started speculating about the old working dogs in the Perth photo scene. I hasten to add I do not mean the people - I have too much respect for the photographers to pry into their ages. Plus I want them to like me enough to buy me coffee and cake on occasion. No, I mean the equipment. I don't know the answer to these questions but I'd welcome answers to the column or in person from the people concerned. Who is shooting professionally with: a. The oldest camera per se. What year was it purchased? b. The oldest analog camera. What work are they tackling with it? c. Ditto the oldest digital camera. Are there any of the original ground breakers still whirring? Where do you get batteries for it? d. Okay, now we go out past where the buses run. Who is using - professionally - the oldest and smallest memory card? Do they shoot with their fingers crossed? You can pursue this line of enquiry for the enthusiasts and amateur users as well. They don't have to earn a living with the...

What's In A Name?   It seems that the photography world is divided over the importance of brand names - especially when it comes to choosing a camera. Of course, there are die-hard fans that would fall on a sword for their beloved Canon, Nikon, Sony and Fujifilm. Some couldn't care less about being brand-loyal. They want the best camera with the right features regardless of what badge sits at the front. And then, there are the Leica groupies - and the debate to establish if Leica is more than just a name. One side of the fence has shot with Leica for a very long time. The other, don't see the value in spending five times what a non-Leica camera costs for the same performance.  First a little history. Ernst Leitz founded the Leica company in 1869 in Wetzlar, Germany - it was formally known as Ernst Leitz Optische Company. The very first Leica, and the first successful 35mm camera ever developed, was invented by Oskar Barnack. Barnack was an engineer and a passionate travel photographer - this passion resulted in the...