Author: Uncle Dick

I have no idea if you can do this. But the thought of pod of scuba divers with the munchies putting through an order to Dominos while off the Busselton Jetty is fascinating. Does Uber deliver beyond the surf line? How do you keep the Neapolitan Special from getting soggy? Do the prawns swim off the top of the thin 'n crispy? As it is, I suspect the AXIS Go smart phone cases are intended to let you take pictures underwater, rather than call people up. The housings look to be extremely well made, durable and versatile. The all-important sealing function is down with a proper rubber seals and O-ring grease. The opreerating buttons are ring-sealed. The latching is positive and protected against inadvertent release. There are enough standardised attachment points to construct a comprehensive rig - or to anchor the thing to you so that it cannot fall away and be lost. The housing is not cheap, and neither is your phone. If this was not enough, there are accessory lenses to extent the vision - including a fish-eye dome port. The daunting prospect...

Fujifilm X-100V, please, and step on it. I don't want to be late. I am a man of my word - I brought down suitable models for the Fujifilm X-100V test as I said I would. 1:43 scale models of a taxi and a mustard van. And yes, I would trade my car for a 30's Ford sedan or a Citroen H van in a second. Not sure if I'd haul mustard in it but it would make a cool camper conversion. The reason for the toy cars was to test out the new lens formulation on the x-100V. The original lens of the X-100 and the three subsequent iterations was glorious for general photography but started to soften up at the edges when you moved into extremely close-up range with the camera. For a model shooter it limited the use to medium distances. Otherwise, the fact that the camera never had dust-bunnies on the sensor and synched at all speeds with the studio lights made it a dream to use. Roll on to now and look at the Ford. Excellent focus  -...

What have we here? Exactly the camera I have been waiting to test! And no-one told me it was lurking in the Fujifilm cabinet.  Luckily I peer everywhere in the Camera Electronic shops and always have done. I would recommend it to all the readers. You can discover more in Stirling and Murray Street than you can wading through a steamy jungle. The new Fujifilm X-100V is here in silver with the black version set to arrive in a few months. You can decide yourself which looks best to you, but I must say the silver is elegant. If you are an Adobe user you'll be restricted at present to the jpeg settings - ACR on lightroom doesn't open its RAW files yet. I daresay this is coming soon. No matter- the Fujifilm jpegs are excellent and the camera seems to cope very will with exposures under varying lighting conditions.   The two front views of the camera show it to be very similar to the basic outline of the previous X-100 series cameras. You'll be hard pressed to see the subtle casing differences...

We normally don't promote a manufacturer's range of products with a picture of someone else's goods in the same advertisement - it certainly wasn't done in the golden age of Madison Avenue. They might have hinted about " Brand X" and " Brand Y " and made fake motor-car tyres out of plaster and wood to pretend that one was superior ( and they did...

Every field of human endeavour has old-hat ideas, new-hat ideas, and hatless scatter-brain maniac ideas. The trick of commercial success is to convert the first and the last to the middle sort - this is the thing that pays money. I'll explain. The technique of shooting pinhole photos on sheet film or paper is old-hat. It either requires hardly anything at all or a whole raft of special equipment. The minimalists will go out with a pin, a cardboard box, and a stack of bricks and construct an ur-camera on the site of some landscape. The results may be wonderful, but probably won't. The pinhole will be too big, the box will leak light, and piling the bricks on it for a long exposure will not work. The technicians will buy a large-format camera, a laser-cut pinhole disk, a special lens plate, and holders of the fastest film available. They will attach the rig to a massive tripod and weight it down with...

If you go to the right places and keep your eyes open you learn something. Tuesday night last at Camera Electronic was one of those places when Michael Philips and Daniel Carson presented the new Nikon D780 body to the audience. I was sorry for Michael because I think the thunderstorm that hit Perth just before dusk kept a lot of potential viewers away. I was sorry for me when I tried to drive in Vic Park just after the thing went through...

And we do the rest. Even better than Kodak - you don't even have to press the button. Camera Electronic's shop in Murray Street is the home of the new Shoebox Service. Courtesy of some very clever machinery and programming , the staff at Murray Street can now turn your shoebox laibility into a digital asset. The deal is this - you take in your shoebox or envelope of paper prints - and they must be between 5 cm x 5 cm and 20 cm x 30 cm - and must be unmounted with no backing paper - and the staff carefully scan them for you. It may be the work of minutes or hours but the important points to remember is that they are not your minutes and hours and you are not going to be asked to pay for the time taken. You just deliver and then collect later. The prints coming in cannot be on big album pages - the staff will not unmount them. Nor can they be in those big cardboard studio frames. You'll have to remove them from...