When Adventure Calls…

When Adventure Calls…

Make sure that Adventure pays the phone bill – otherwise you are in real trouble…

Keeping out of real trouble with your new iPhone 7 is the theme of today’s column. Specifically, how to use the blessed thing to take stills and videos underwater and in rugged conditions… without ruining it. You paid enough to the Apple people in the first place – you do not want to go back a remake their fortunes every time you drown it.

Taking your phone underwater may have sounded like an exercise in strange behaviour a few years ago – the sort of thing that Maxwell Smart and Agent 99 would try. But these days the wonderful image quality available from Apple mobile phones combined with the familiarity and ease of the operating system means that taking them for a dive is perfectly normal. But the fact that the phones cost more than an ” Ohio ” class submarine means that you need to get serious with your protection.

The Axis Go cases are the thing. Here’s three colours in stock right now – the orange being the most useful one for divers. As you’ll see from the pictures, it opens like a clamshell and provides both proper sealing around the perimeter and protected controls for the iPhone 7 buttons.

The clamp that finally applies pressure is a massive thing. You can be confident in the sealed front and back ports as well.

I’ve never dived with a phone or camera, but I can readily see the good sense in the arrangements made on top and bottom of the Axis Go casing – the four 1/4″ screw sockets are on the bottom for rigs and tripods, and the three ditto on the top are for lights and other accessories. Those are hard metal plates top and bottom. The whole thing is quite heavy, so perhaps you need to attach floats to the top…?

Poor conditions in other locations would also mean a good opportunity to use this case – If you can’t get water into it, you also need not fear oil, dust, or chemical fumes. I should imagine that the white casing would be useful in operating theatres if it could be swabbed over with Betadine every now and then. And a lanyard could be screwed into one of the many sockets in case it was dropped into the patient…

Joking aside, and leaving the diving to the divers, I can also see the good sense of this sort of housing for situations where there is a degree of rough and tumble involved. Work colleagues and friends have all shown me cracked phone screens and other physical damage and the cost of repair is not small – what a good idea to provide some protection beforehand.

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